7 Best Places to Snowmobile Trails in Utah

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Snowmobiling opportunities abound in Utah! 

There’s something for everyone, from deep backcountry explorations to groomed trails near the city.

Snowmobiling is permitted in most mountain areas of Utah, with dozens of popular trailheads. The terrain varies from steep hill climbing to trail riding to simply playing in a powdery meadow. 

Access to steep hill climbing terrain and steep, treed boondocking is possible for those with the proper equipment and avalanche skills. Those without avalanche skills or equipment can have a great time in the gentler beginner terrain.

Here are some places which are best to snowmobile in Utah……

Best Places to Snowmobile in Utah

best places to snowmobile in Utah

Bear Lake Valley

The Bear Lake Valley area has some of the best snowmobile trails in Utah, with access to over 350 miles of groomed snowmobile trails and off-trail wilderness areas spanning northern Utah to southeastern Idaho.

Wind your way through forested canyons and powder meadows, past winter waterfalls, and switch back to snowy peaks 9,000 feet above sea level, to breathtaking views of the lake itself located between the Tetons and the Uinta Mountains.

The 6.5-mile Beaver Creek trail is a good starting point, and keep an eye out for the more difficult Garden City trail, which leads to both the Sinks Road Trail, with its many turnoffs allowing prime exploration, and the 34-mile St. Charles Canyon/Fish Haven Loop, which has proven to be a winter thrill-seeker destination.

The Uinta Mountains

The Uinta Mountains are a must-see for anyone who enjoys backcountry snowmobiling.

This is Utah’s highest mountain range, so you’ll see a lot of snow and be able to go deep into the wilderness away from the crowds. This results in a very long winter and the ability to ride good snow from November until April or May.

If you’re a seasoned rider looking to get your feet wet, the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest is a good place to start. Nearly 500,000 acres are specifically designated for snowmobiling.

That is a lot of lands to ride on, but it can be intimidating for beginners. Don’t worry if that describes you. There are still 220 miles of groomed trails and several high-quality guide services available here.

Snowmobile Park in the Cedar Mountains

With over 100 miles of groomed snowmobile trails, this area in the Dixie National Forest is one of the best places to go snowmobiling in southern Utah. The spectacular scenic views along the way include not only the forest but also Zion National Park on the Lars Fork Trail and Cedar Breaks National Monument on the High Mountain Trail. 

Another popular area trail is the Brian Head Trail, which offers breathtaking high mountain and vista views as you approach 11,000 feet above sea level. Those looking for narrow, densely wooded trails through an aspen and mixed pine forest prefer the Sage Valley Trail. 

Keep an eye out for a steep section of trail near the junction with the Duck Creek trail, which is a bumpy, narrow path that offers snowmobiling challenges regardless of your experience level.

Park City

Park City makes this list due to its proximity to the Salt Lake City metropolitan area and the abundance of good amenities. It’s well-known for being a popular ski resort, but it also has some fantastic snowmobiling opportunities.

First and foremost, the Park City area is breathtakingly beautiful. Getting away from the main town center allows you to experience the vast wilderness, sprawling mountain ranges, and immense blue skies that winter has to offer.

This is a good area to ride if you want a guided tour or if you didn’t bring your sled. There are numerous guide services and private locations to choose from.

Park City Peaks is a long-established guide service located on a private 60,000-acre ranch. Their service is excellent, and the location is fantastic.

Heber Valley

You won’t want to miss out on the spectacular scenic mountains and sprawling open spaces that make Heber Valley a winter enthusiast’s paradise. The area offers over 1,000 miles of groomed snowmobile trails, 200 miles of which are groomed – through a wide variety of dramatic mountains, forest, meadow, and plateau terrain – so you never have to repeat yourself. 

With plenty of deep snow, this is an ideal location for exploring and carving your own path through the pristine Utah wilderness. 

While you’re in the area, you might want to visit Wasatch Mountain State Park, Utah’s second-largest state park, which has around 70 miles of well-groomed snowmobile trails, including the longest trail in the area at 15.7 miles round trip, Mill Flat Trail, which is challenging, especially for beginning riders, but well worth the effort because of the beautiful views of Lone Peak and Mount Timpanogos.

Ephraim/Manti/Mayfield

It is located in the central part of the state on a plateau above the towns of Ephraim, Manti, and Mayfield.

The Skyline Drive trail, which will take you to elevations above 10,000 feet, is a popular route for snowmobilers in this area. There are numerous other trails within the complex that are worth exploring, so take a look at this map and go for it.

Taking any of the trails to the top of the Wasatch plateau is also recommended. The views are spectacular, and once you reach the top, you can really let it rip. My favorite way to get to the plateau is probably via the Manti Canyon Trail.

The Cedar Mountains

If you’ve ever visited southern Utah, you know that its beauty is one-of-a-kind and unparalleled. The colors and shapes of the rocks here can make you feel as if you’re on another planet. And, despite the fact that it is partly desert, there are some excellent snowmobiling opportunities here.

The High Mountain Trail will provide you with breathtaking views of Cedar Breaks National Monument. The contrast between the sky, snow, and red rock is incredible if you catch it on a bluebird snow day.

If you want to go deeper into the monument, the Cedar Breaks Trail runs right through it. You can take it easy on the first section before tackling a steep ascent to the top, where you’ll be rewarded with yet another mind-boggling lookout point. 

It’s a more technical trail due to windblown snow and other obstacles, but it’s worthwhile if you have the skills.

Final Words

If you have the opportunity, it is strongly advised to you to visit and ride at any of these locations. If you go into the Utah backcountry, just make sure you’re well-prepared and cautious.