9 Best Snowmobile Boots of 2022: Tested by Real Riders

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You know how a good pair of snowmobile boots can make snowmobiling fun and comfy. But what if you are baffled by the many options available?

Are you exhausted looking at the different features each boot claims to offer? Don’t worry! You’re on the right page.

Keep reading to find out what are the best snowmobile boots and how their features can be of help. 

Best Snowmobile Boots for 2022

KLIM Adrenaline Pro GTX Boots

This snowmobile BOA boot provides an amazing waterproof feature, thanks to its Gore-Tex technology. I would say this is one of the best boots for snowmobiling if you want to focus on water resistance.

Its 60600 Grams Of 3M insulation keeps your feet warm and dry. It has an extremely aggressive sole and you can go snowmobiling in any kind of terrain.

I found this boot to be so soft inside yet so durable on the sole outside. It has internal cushioning that makes this possible.

Its BOA system saves you from the trouble of laces that can cause annoyance and harm. So these sled boots also care for your safety.

It’s highly breathable and it keeps my feet free from sweat. Dry and warm feet are a guarantee with these boots.

Pros
  • Durable
  • Waterproof
  • Breathable
  • Easy to wear
Cons
  • Expensive

Baffin Impact Boots

This boot is a perfect high-performance boot for those who enjoy winter adventures outdoors. It features wind-proof nylon upper with double buckles and a toggle-close snow collar that gives warmth.

It has a waterproof base with a Gelflex midsole. So, if you’re just like me and don’t like boots that are not waterproof, then you’ll love these boots.

It also comes with an 8-layer removable inner lining, a foam insole, and a rugged, deep-traction rubber outsole. This gives you breathability and also durable sled boots.

These are designed to provide comfort and protection in the most extreme climates. Trust me, I researched many boots for snowmobiling, and these are one of the warmest snowmobile boots I found.

Pros
  • Great traction
  • Dry and warm feet
  • Comfort and durability
  • Affordable
Cons
  • Mid-calf length and not knee high

Columbia Ice Maiden II

These women’s snow bike boots have a waterproof leather upper that features a seam-sealed membrane bootie construction, and TECH LITE lightweight midsole, which provides long-lasting comfort with superior cushioning and high energy return.

I found this boot to have the perfect combination of function and style, with its quilted ankle support. You’ll find plenty of flex in the boot that also looks great wherever you go.

The Omni-GRIP non-marking traction rubber outsole provides versatility for all winter wear without worry during indoor use. 

It features a soft faux fur collar, reinforced lacing aglets, excellent 200g insulation, and leather-reinforced toe and heels. I felt super warm and comfortable wearing these.

It is rated -25F/-32C for cold, heavy snow days. It also is made of waterproof leather and a textile upper. Your feet are guaranteed to be kept dry while snowmobiling.

Pros
  • Stylish look
  • Comfortable wear
  • Durable
  • Warm
Cons
  • Size runs smaller than regular ones.

Fly Racing Marker BOA Boot

This snowmobile boa boot with an M4-Series BOA dial gives quick and easy in and out and customized fit. I loved these boots for the BOA system instead of lacing.

It has 600g thermal insulation and comfort rated down to -40F. These keep my feet warm without compromising their lightweight nature.

It has a hydro guard breathable waterproof membrane and genuine leather upper for extra longevity and wears protection. 

It has a reinforced toe and heel for high impact. So if you are a clumsy person like me, these boots have you covered safely. These are double-stitched for extra durability. 

Its reflective side and back panels provide maximum visibility and this boot has a slip-resistant rubber sole for exceptional traction. They come with oversized padded boot laces for each tightening. So if you have wide feet like me then you can choose this boot.

Pros
  • Excellent traction
  • Slip-resistant
  • Waterproof
  • Durable
Cons
  • I could find no negatives to these boots.

SOREL Caribou Boot

These boots are fully seam-sealed snow boot for women that is ideal for everything from relaxing to running errands in the snow. 

The removable 9mm washable recycled felt inner boot with Sherpa pile snow cuff will keep your feet warm and cozy for all your winter adventures. It has a classic design with waterproof nubuck leather upper and seam-sealed construction to keep your feet dry in heavy snow

You can walk securely with a handcrafted waterproof vulcanized rubber shell with SOREL aero-track non-loading outsole securing your traction.

This snow boot comes with a heel height of 1 1/6″ with a 5/7″ platform that will give you all-day comfort, while the 2.5mm bonded felt frost plug warns off the cold and the snow. 

Pros
  • Warmth and dryness
  • All day comfort
  • Waterproof
  • Durable
Cons
  • Bit heavy

509 Raid Boa Boots

Cited as one of the most lightweight snow bike boots on the market, the 509 Raid Snowmobile Boa boots are a perfect blend of support and performance. These are also one of my personal favorite boots for snowmobiling.

These are specifically designed to survive the harshest days for an extended period, so whether you are mountain riding or ice fishing on your snowmobile, these boots can handle it all!

These boots come with a ‘dual boa’ system that lets you adjust the top and bottom of the boots separately. This helps the rider get a more custom fit with the right combination of ankle support and flexibility.

Furthermore, their well-known Boa lacing system makes the boots more efficient by replacing the standard laces with stainless steel wires and a turning knob, which helps you adjust the laces as per your needs.

They are also accompanied by their trademarked ‘5TECH’ breathable liner, which is exceptionally waterproof and keeps your feet dry for longer durations.

Another noticeable feature, they come with thick carbon outsoles and strop upper body augmentation, this enables the rider to get a firmer grip and withstand harsher riding with utmost comfort.

Further installed with their patented ‘Thinsulate’ insulation, these boots provide extended and complete protection against freezing conditions and can handle temperatures as low as -15 degrees Celsius.

One thing I don’t like about them is the durability issue. A few riders have noticed that these boots start to show some wear and tear after a couple of rides, so the durability can definitely be improved. But, for others, they worked just fine after many rides.

Nonetheless, these boots are a fantastic option for anyone looking to maneuver the rough mountains or even the icy terrains.

Pros
  • Dual-BOA system
  • Breathable
  • Firm Grip
  • Enhanced freezing protection
Cons
  • Not durable

FXR X-Cross Pro Speed Boot

The X-Cross Pro Speed boots are another excellent alternative for a variety of activities ranging from trail riding to snowmobiling.

Accompanied by ‘speed lace’ technology and a sewn-in molded hook system, these boots are extremely easy to put on and take off. This also enables the rider to get a more custom fit without any compromise on comfort and performance.

Furthermore, rated at -40 degrees Celsius with 600g insulation, these boots will keep your feet warm and dry for hours without any difficulty. If you’re someone who likes to ride snowmobiles in extremely cold weather, then you should go with them.

They also offer thick EVA midsole padding (20mm) and soft fur inner lining; this makes sure that your foot gets adequate grip along with utmost comfort without feeling too stiff or harsh.

They also have sturdy toe cap rubber reinforcements along with Achilles and calf support, this further ensures that your entire foot inside the boots gets the necessary support efficiently.

This is especially important when you are maneuvering through tricky places; the attributes mentioned above make sure that your feet get maximum support without bending too much.

Despite all these favorable features, many consumers have complained that these shoes are a little less durable and break off easily after a few rides, mostly in the case of rough usage.

If I have to go riding in the extreme cold weather, then these will be my number one choice.

Pros
  • Easy to wear
  • Build for extreme cold
  • Achilles and calf support
  • Great padding
Cons
  • Less durable

Castle X Barrier 2 Boots

If you are planning to go snowmobiling and love snow adventures, these Castle barrier snowmobile boots are the best option to opt for.

There is an impressive range of colors available in these snowmobile boots, whether you like a funky look or a sober touch, these castle barrier snowmobile boots have a huge collection to sync with your personality and style.

Now, if we come to the comfort, these are the best snowmobile boots for mountain riding available to provide you with that warmth and ease, even when your feet are buried two feet under snow. I like comfortable boots, so I definitely recommend them.

Moreover, these are super light to easily put on and off, weighing just 6 pounds.

If we talk about the property of these snowmobile boots, which makes them stand out from the rest is ‘insulation’ or more accurately it is the insulation material.

It is a 3- layer blend of Marino wool, this all-natural material has incredible wicking properties and will keep your feet dry and warm for extended periods.

Looking at the outer sections, here are some impressive features too. For example, the upper is 1000 denier nylon with leather trim in strategic locations. The soles are molded and include a high abrasion toe.

A simple but effective buckle and strap installation will both keep your feet secure along with being easy to operate with cold, numb hands. A drawstring is a final cherry on the top, allowing a close and secure fit designed to keep the moisture out.

Moreover, these boots possess a snow shield gaiter with bungee cord lock and a rubber sole with internal EVA shock comfort chambers, for a better experience of snowmobiling.

These boots can withstand temperatures in the range of -60*F / -51*C, thus making them an all-time go-to when preparing for snowmobiling in winter. Just like the FXR boots, they can also be your number one choice for cold weather.

Just one more tip from me if you are planning to buy one, go for one size smaller than your original size, otherwise, they will be sloppy on your feet and you will not experience the best comfort and satisfaction while you are snowmobiling.

Pros
  • Great looks
  • Lightweight
  • Warm
  • Comfortable
Cons
  • Weird Sizing

Joe Rocket Snowmobile Boots

If you’re a beginner or a casual enjoyer of snowmobiling, then you’ll love the Joe Rocket Snowmobile Boots!

Sure, they have leather uppers just like Marker Boots to retain their features for a long, long time, along with rubber outsoles for easier grip.

But other than these, here’s where things start to be a little different!

Instead of a lace system, Joe Rocket has a buckle closure for a quick-and-easy fastening AND to lessen the chances of getting snagged while you’re riding down the mountain or snowmobiling.

However, these straps aren’t as durable as the rest of the boot, so you might find them breaking on you early.

Still, the inside is insulated by removable liners from DuPont and Thermolite that can handle temperatures at sub-zero; specifically, at negative sixty degrees!

And while Fly Racing makes use of reflectivity in its boots, the same goes with Joe Rocket.

I think if you’re someone who is a beginner, and on a tight budget, then you should go with them. I have researched many boots, and these are one of the cheapest snowmobile boots you can buy.

Pros
  • Works great in low temperature
  • Beginner-friendly
  • Comfortable
  • Buckle Closure
Cons
  • Cheap looking finish

How to Choose Snowmobile Boots

Warmth and Cosiness

Warmth is directly related to how well insulated and dry the inside of the boot is. And how well it keeps snow and wet out.

For this, you must look for the insulation of the boot and the material of the liner the boot is made of. A 600g Thinsulate insulation is a moderate one and anything higher provides greater warmth. 

Water Resistance

Snowmobiling can become messy and uncomfortable if your feet are gonna get wet by the snow. So the next important factor to consider before buying snowmobile boots is the water resistance they can offer.

Most snow boots for riding are waterproof and they are made of water-repelling materials to keep the moisture at bay. 

Look for snowmobile boots with removable liners. Take them out after every ride to dry overnight beside a radiator or heat vent. If necessary, put them in the hotel dryer for a cycle to dry them out. Now you’ll start every day with warm feet, especially if you preheat the inside of your liners with the hotel dryer, a boot dryer, or even a hair dryer.

I hate when my feet get wet in cold weather. So, when I buy boots, for snowmobiling or for just any other casual winter boots, then water resistance is one of my top priorities.

Proper Fitting

This is very crucial for comfortable snowmobiling. An ill-fitting boot can either cause bruises or can easily fall off your foot causing accidents. How do you choose the right size then?

Check by wearing the boots with socks and see if there is appropriate toe space not too much or too little. Make sure you feel comfortable in the heel and sole also. Don’t go for boots that cramp your toes.

In the past, I have used boots one size smaller than my actual size, and after wearing them for hours, and on multiple days, I regret my decision of wearing them.

Comfortability

What’s more desirable than a comfortable snowmobiling boot for riders? Comfort depends on the sole material and the ease of use.

Look for soft materials for the insole with durable traction providing the outer sole. It’s recommended to go for the BOA system instead of regular lacing for easy on and off and a customized fit.

Go with boots that are comfortable. I’m more than happy to wear my old, bad-looking comfortable boots than wearing brand new, stylish boots that are not comfortable.

Fashion

Well, this is important too. Who doesn’t want a stylish pair of snowmobile boots that can attract attention? But this must be the last criterion. This is not a deal breaker for me.

Look for trendy colors and fashionable straps. Women can go for boots with faux fur to make the look stylish. 

The Grip of the Boots

As a snowmobile rider, you do not want to slip or slide on the icy terrains as you need to have a hold on your gear. Therefore, you need to look out for a sole that can offer you enough tread to prevent you from slipping and falling down.

However, you need to give a thought to those heels, the higher the heels more slippery they can get thus try and buy boots with low heel height. Nowadays, there are boots available in the markets which are available with grooves in their soles to give the best grip on the steep snow.

The soles which are made up of thermoplastic rubber (TPR) are softer than the rubber compound soles and also they are known to provide a better grip even in adverse winter conditions.

However, I have seen that the snow boots of all the good brands have a good grip. So, this is a good thing for people like us.

Final Words

Snowmobiling is the activity or sport to ride snowmobiles. Boots are the most important part while choosing the best gear for this sport.

Even, when you’re snowmobiling with your kids, you should also provide them with boots.

The boots should be comfortable, waterproof, and should be of the perfect size.

If the boots are not comfortable, you will not be able to easily walk in the snow. The boots should be waterproof if the boots are not waterproof they will allow the water to affect your feet when submerged and drenched in water.

As there are various sizes available in the boots, you should be able to choose the perfect size which will fit.

The boots should be chosen carefully as they are the most essential part of the gear while you go snowmobiling.

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